Understanding Metastatic Breast Cancer

Visceral metastases are associated with more aggressive MBC1-3

Compared to those with nonvisceral metastases, patients with metastatic breast cancer who develop visceral metastases are likely to have a less favorable outcome3

  • Approximately 67-73% of patients with MBC have presented with visceral metastases4a
  • Approximately 57-74% MBC patients have presented with visceral metastases as the dominant site of metastases1b

There is lower median survival time for patients who develop visceral metastases vs nonvisceral metastases3c

aCharacteristics from a retrospective database analysis of 111 patients with primary breast cancer and concurrent distant metastases seen between 2005 and 2007.4
bCharacteristics from a retrospective review of 640 MBC patients who entered into 6 consecutive trials between 1983 and 2001.1
cUnivariate survival analysis from a retrospective database of 346 patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer after first recurrence between 1970 and 1991. All patients had undergone surgery for primary breast cancer and may have received radiation, hormonal therapy, and/or chemotherapy for metastatic disease.3

Visceral metastases are associated with more aggressive MBC1-3

Compared to those with nonvisceral metastases, patients with metastatic breast cancer who develop visceral metastases are likely to have a less favorable outcome3

  • Approximately 67-73% of patients with MBC have presented with visceral metastases4a
  • Approximately 57-74% MBC patients have presented with visceral metastases as the dominant site of metastases1b

There is lower median survival time for patients who develop visceral metastases vs nonvisceral metastases3c

aCharacteristics from a retrospective database analysis of 111 patients with primary breast cancer and concurrent distant metastases seen between 2005 and 2007.4
bCharacteristics from a retrospective review of 640 MBC patients who entered into 6 consecutive trials between 1983 and 2001.1
cUnivariate survival analysis from a retrospective database of 346 patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer after first recurrence between 1970 and 1991. All patients had undergone surgery for primary breast cancer and may have received radiation, hormonal therapy, and/or chemotherapy for metastatic disease.3

INDICATION

ABRAXANE is indicated for the treatment of breast cancer after failure of combination chemotherapy for metastatic disease or relapse within 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy. Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline unless clinically contraindicated.

INDICATION

ABRAXANE is indicated for the treatment of breast cancer after failure of combination chemotherapy for metastatic disease or relapse within 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy. Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline unless clinically contraindicated.