Financial Support and Educational Resources

How can I find financial support for ABRAXANE?

Celgene Patient Support®

At Celgene Patient Support®, we care about making sure you get the answers you need on your ABRAXANE treatment journey. We know starting on treatment can be difficult. Insurance can be hard to understand. And, you may need help paying for ABRAXANE. Celgene Patient Support® can help you and your loved ones understand the programs and services available to you. And, in many cases we can help reduce the cost of ABRAXANE to $0.

Enrollment is simple. When you enroll in Celgene Patient Support®, you will speak to the same Specialist every time you call. You and your family can count on free, personal help with:

At Celgene, we believe nothing should come between you and your medicine.

Programs that may be able to help you with costs of ABRAXANE differ by the type of insurance you have. But, no matter what type of insurance you have, Celgene Patient Support® can help.

Your Insurance Type
How Celgene Patient Support® Can Help You
Eligibility
Your Insurance Type

Commercial insurance

This type of insurance is given by your employer or purchased on your own or through a healthcare exchange. It could also be part of your retirement package from an employer.

How Celgene Patient Support® Can Help You

  • The Celgene Commercial Co-pay Program may reduce your co-pay responsibility for ABRAXANE to $0a

Eligibility

  • You have commercial insurance
  • Your household income is $100,000 or less
  • You live in the United States or Puerto Rico
Your Insurance Type

Medicare, Medicaid, or other government-sponsored insurance

Medicare is provided by the federal government. Medicaid is provided by your state government.

How Celgene Patient Support® Can Help You

  • Celgene Patient Support® can connect you to organizations that may be able to lower your co-pay responsibility

Eligibility

  • Eligibility requirements vary by organization
Your Insurance Type

I do not have insurance of enough coverage to pay for ABRAXANE.

How Celgene Patient Support® Can Help You

  • Celgene Patient Support® has a program that may be able to provide you with free medication

Eligibility

  • You must meet certain financial criteria. Your Specialist can tell you if you qualify

aYou may still have a co-payment for your doctor’s visit.

At Celgene, we know how hard it can be to understand your health insurance.

Your Specialist can help answer your questions. We will work with your doctor’s office and your health insurance plan to get you started on ABRAXANE.

The cost of ABRAXANE depends on your health insurance. If you do not have health insurance or enough coverage to pay for ABRAXANE, call your Specialist at 1-800-931-8691.

Before you start ABRAXANE, your doctor’s office may need to see if your health insurance will pay for it. This is called a benefits investigation. We can help your doctor’s office with this step. A benefits investigation will tell your doctor:

  • If ABRAXANE is covered
  • What ABRAXANE will cost you
  • If your health insurance must approve ABRAXANE before you start. This is called precertification or a prior authorization

Do you need help with the costs of getting to and from your doctor’s office?

Celgene Patient Support® can help locate transportation assistance options to assist with the costs of travelling to and from your doctor visits.

Please contact a Celgene Patient Support® Specialist to learn more about financial help for ABRAXANE.

Call: 1-800-931-8691, Monday – Friday, ET

Visit: www.CelgenePatientSupport.com

Advanced Metatstatic Breast Cancer Patient Support Enrollment Button

E-mail: patientsupport@celgene.com

Fax: 1-800-822-2496

Advanced Metatstatic Breast Cancer Patient Support Enrollment Button

caregiver-support

As a caregiver, where can I find support and resources?

Where can I find support as a caregiver?

One of the biggest challenges you may face as a caregiver to a person with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is asking for help. Balancing your loved one’s needs with your own can be challenging. But you don’t have to go through it alone. Here are some tips to help you get the support you need.

Caregiver Support for patients with Advanced Metatstatic Breast Cancer
Click on the “+” sign for more information

Do Your Research

Do-Your-ResearchLearn as much as you can about advanced NSCLC and your loved one’s treatment plan.

Communicate Clearly

Communicate-ClearlyBe clear and direct so you can learn how best to help your loved one.

Spend Time Together

Spend-Time-TogetherBesides attending doctor visits together, do things that have nothing to do with your loved one’s illness, like going to a movie or taking a walk outdoors, if your loved one is able to.

Share Your Role With Others

Look for other family members or friends who are willing to share the caregiver role with you.

Participate in Office Visits

When you take your loved one to doctor visits, be sure to take notes and ask questions. Knowing what to expect and understanding what is happening can help you feel less helpless.

Accept Your Feelings

It’s natural to feel anger, grief, or guilt at times. Having these feelings doesn’t mean that you don’t love your family member or that you aren’t a good caregiver. They’re perfectly normal.

Ask Others to Help

Ask-Others-to-HelpMake a list of activities that other friends or family members can sign up for. They may be waiting to find out what they can do to help.

Be Specific

Often people around you want to help but don’t know how. Asking for help with specific tasks will help them offer the help you really need.

Don’t Be Shy

If your friends and family members offer to help out and share the workload, accept it.

Keep up Your Own Physical Health

It is important to eat well, exercise, and get fresh air and rest so that you can be relaxed and positive.

Know Your Limits

We all have our limits. Be realistic about how much you can take on and ask for help from others. Others may have different skills they can bring to help manage tasks you don’t feel prepared to take on.

Connect With Other Caregivers of People With NSCLC

ConnectThere is no substitute for talking to people who are going through the same experience as you.

Remember, asking for help doesn’t mean that you’re not a good caregiver. It allows you to focus on the bigger responsibilities of a caregiver for a loved one with advanced cancer.

For more information on caregiver support, visit the following organizations. Many have numerous resources and avenues for connecting with other caregivers.

The independent organizations listed are provided as an additional resource for obtaining information related to cancer and advanced NSCLC. Inclusion on this list does not indicate endorsement by Celgene Corporation of an organization or its communications.

As a patient, where can I learn more? Support and resources

Where can I find support?

Support can come from many sources—your family, friends, colleagues—even strangers who eventually become friends as you join a community of people facing similar challenges. Support can also come from organizations that provide resources to help you better understand what to expect living with advanced cancer. Knowing what to look for and where to turn are key to getting the support you need.

How can I get the support I need?

Family members, friends, neighbors, coworkers, and other people close to you are among your most important care partners. Your cancer diagnosis affects everyone who cares about you. Many of the people in your personal circle want to help but may not know how.

Here are some things you may want to ask your caregivers to help you with:

  • Gather information, and help you make decisions
  • Go with you to doctor visits and checkups
  • Make a list of your medical and emergency contacts
  • Help with financial, legal, or health insurance matters
  • Organize volunteers to bring you meals, take you to treatments, or run errands for you
  • Help keep up your appetite, weight, and strength by cooking tempting foods and creating pleasant settings for meals
  • Listen when you need to vent your feelings or frustrations
  • Entertain you or keep you company when you want to relax or have fun
  • Help with household chores like laundry, cleaning, grocery shopping, or dog walking
  • Go for walks with you to help you stay active

How can I talk to my loved ones about my cancer?

Letting your family and friends know about what you are going through can bring you comfort. But it can also be stressful. People do not always react the way you hope they will. These tips may help make it easier to talk with others about your cancer.

Talking with your loved ones about Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
  • Give some thought to what you might say. Think about what you want other people to know and write it down
  • Decide who to tell and when. You may want to start with a close friend who has “been there for you” in the past. Choose a time to talk that feels right to you
  • Find the best way to share the information. You may want to tell some people face to face, some on the phone, and others by sending a letter or e-mail
  • Seek expert advice. If you are unsure of what to say, it might help to talk with an oncology social worker or other people who are living with advanced cancer
  • Keep talking. If friends or loved ones react poorly or cannot handle your news, let them know how that makes you feel. Give them a little time to face their own fears about your cancer
Talking with your loved ones about Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Patient Resources

The downloadable resources available on this website have been developed to help you

  • Be prepared for treatment
  • Work closely and effectively with your healthcare team
  • Receive and remember important information during treatment
Download Preparing for My Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment

Preparing for My Treatment

Offers practical tips and a checklist of steps to take to help prepare yourself for treatment. Also includes questions to ask your doctor or nurse, with spaces to write down the answers you are given.

Download Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Brochure

Patient Brochure

Provides in-depth information about treatment with ABRAXANE, including how it works and what to expect, as well as resources to turn to for more information and support.

Download Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Brochure - Spanish Edition

Patient Brochure (Spanish)

Provides a Spanish-language version of in-depth information about treatment with ABRAXANE, including how it works and what to expect, as well as resources to turn to for more information.

NSCLC Webbook/iBook Download

Web Book/iBook of Patient Brochure

Interactive digital versions of the patient brochure for use on PCs, Macs, and portable devices.

Interactive Guide WebbookiBook

Download Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Diary

Treatment Diary

Helps you stay organized by keeping track of appointments and any symptoms you may experience so that you become more aware of how treatment with ABRAXANE may affect you.

Download Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Doctors Visit Discussion Guide

Doctor Visit Discussion Guide

Helps you talk about treatment with ABRAXANE with your doctor before treatment begins.

Download Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Questions for my healthcare team

Questions for My Healthcare Team

Lists frequently asked questions about ABRAXANE and provides space for you to write your own questions for your healthcare team.

Where can I find information and support online?

Your need for services, support, and information about advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may change over time. Knowing where to find the resources you need to help manage these challenges can help you feel more in control. Use the resources listed below to get answers, advice, and help from advocacy groups and peers who understand the needs and concerns of people with advanced NSCLC.

These organizations do not replace talking with your doctor. Ask your healthcare team about other resources they can recommend.

The independent organizations listed are provided as an additional resource for obtaining information related to cancer and NSCLC. Inclusion on this list does not indicate endorsement by Celgene Corporation of an organization or its communications.

Your Concern or Need
Where to Turn for Help
Services Provided

Wondering what to do first?

Learning more about your condition

Lung Cancer Alliance

lungcanceralliance.org 1-800-298-2436

American Lung Cancer Association

lung.org 1-800-586-4872

Free to Breathe

freetobreathe.org 608-828-8852

Connection to a dedicated community of support and information for people with advanced lung cancer offering:

  • Advice from experts
  • Telephone support
  • Patient stories
  • Booklets and newsletters
  • Referrals to resources
  • Conference and webinars

Connecting with other patients and support groups on the Internet, by phone, or in person

To get one-on-one support by phone

Lung Cancer Alliance Phone Buddy Program

1-800-298-2436

Telephone helplines that match you with a trained volunteer who is living with advanced lung cancer

LUNGevity LifeLine

lungevity.org

A free service that provides one-on-one peer support from volunteer mentors who are living with lung cancer, family members, or caregivers

To find a support group in your area

Lung Cancer Alliance

lungcanceralliance.org 1-800-298-2436

Information to help you find a support group in your area and links to telephone, online, or professional support resources

To find a support group in your area

LungCancer.org (a service of CancerCare®)

lungcancer.org 1-800-813-4673

Free counseling and support groups led by oncology social workers to help you manage the emotional and practical challenges of cancer

Cancer Support Community

cancersupportcommunity.org 1-888-793-9355

Referrals to local chapters that run support groups

To connect online with other survivors and caregivers

LUNGevity Lung Cancer Support Community

lungevity.org

American Lung Association Lung Connection

lung.org/connection 1-800-586-4872

Online lung cancer support communities with forums and message boards for patients and caregivers
Online discussions with cancer experts offering information, answers, and updates on cancer treatment and research

Seeking help for anxiety or depression due to cancer-related health issues

American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) Helpline

1-866-276-7443

Referrals to professional counselors who are skilled at helping people manage cancer-related distress

Getting support to stop smoking

Smokefree.gov

smokefree.gov 1-877-448-7848

Help from your state quit line

smokefree.gov 1-800-784-8669

Legacy EX Plan

becomeanex.org

Free tools, resources, and support that can help you quit smoking

Getting advice on how to talk with your healthcare team

A free professional counseling program that helps prepare you to make informed treatment decisions

Understanding your type of cancer and treatment options

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Information Service

1-800-422-6237

American Cancer Society

cancer.org 1-800-227-2345

National Institutes of Health Senior Health

nihseniorhealth.gov

Easy-to-understand information and treatment guidelines for all types and stages of cancer

Choosing an insurance plan or paying for coverage

Health Insurance Marketplace

healthcare.gov 1-800-318-2596

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

cms.gov 1-800-633-4227

Information to help you access healthcare coverage through Medicare, Medicaid, or the Affordable Care Act

Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF)

patientadvocate.org 1-800-532-5274

Free Web chats, webinars, search tools, and guides to help uninsured and underinsured patients find resources to help ease the burden of paying for treatment

Seeking information about financial or legal issues related to cancer

Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF)

patientadvocate.org 1-800-532-5274

Cancer Legal Resource Center

disabilityrightslegalcenter.org 1-866-843-2572

Free professional information about health insurance, medical debt, disability, or job-related issues

Getting help with the cost of transportation to and from treatment

Limited grants to help people with lung cancer pay for transportation as well as home care and child care

American Cancer Society

lungcancer.org 1-800-227-2345

Referrals to local and national groups that provide funding for travel and other out-of-pocket expenses related to treatment

Getting information on pain or side effects of treatment to discuss with your healthcare team

CancerCare®

cancercare.org 1-800-813-4673

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Information Service

1-800-422-6237

Practical information about pain and/or side effects of cancer treatment

Learning how to cope with hair loss and skin changes

Look Good Feel Better

lookgoodfeelbetter.org 1-800-395-5665

Free workshops offering makeup, beauty, and skin care tips to women in treatment for cancer

Lining up home care or help for older adults

Eldercare Locator

eldercare.gov 1-800-677-1116

Free referrals to community services for older adults and their families

Organizing help from friends and family

MyLifeLine.org

mylifeline.org

CaringBridge®

caringbridge.org

Websites and mobile apps that allow you to set up a free, private online network for giving and receiving help

Getting support for caregivers

LUNGevity Caregiver Support

lungevity.org/caregiver

Cancer Support Community

cancersupportcommunity.org 1-888-793-9355

Family Caregiver Alliance

caregiver.org 1-800-445-8106

Support groups, information, advice, and referrals to resources for local and long-distance caregiving
Your Concern or Need

Wondering what to do first?

Learning more about your condition

Connecting with other patients and support groups on the Internet, by phone, or in person

Seeking help for anxiety or depression due to cancer-related health issues

Getting support to stop smoking

Getting advice on how to talk with your healthcare team

Understanding your type of cancer and treatment options

Choosing an insurance plan or paying for coverage

Seeking information about financial or legal issues related to cancer

Getting help with the cost of transportation to and from treatment

Getting information on pain or side effects of treatment to discuss with your healthcare team

Learning how to cope with hair loss and skin changes

Lining up home care or help for older adults

Organizing help from friends and family

Getting support for caregivers

Where can I find cultural resources?

Cancer is individual and very personal. One person’s experience may be very different from another’s experience. There are many things that make living with any illness personal, including a person’s culture or ethnicity. The organizations listed below offer information and resources specific to certain ethnic groups and cultures.

African Americans

Blackdoctor.org

blackdoctor.org 312-222-1205 Health news and features specifically targeted to African Americans. Includes information written in everyday language, a searchable directory of qualified African American doctors, and community blogs on thought-provoking information from health writers and doctors.

Hispanic Americans

Latinas Contra Cancer

latinascontracancer.org 1-888-522-8110 Education, navigation, and support for the underserved Latino population affected by cancer. Bilingual services include educational workshops, support groups, case management, and patient navigation.

National Alliance for Hispanic Health

hispanichealth.org/resources 202-387-5000 Programs that focus on improving the health and well-being of Hispanics and securing health for all. Available resources include the Let’s Talk About Living With Cancer (Hablemos sobre la vida con cancer) bilingual booklet that provides those living with cancer as well as their friends and family with general information and resources on cancer.

Asian Americans

Asian American Health Initiative

aahiinfo.org 240-777-4517 Programs and activities that help narrow the communication gap created by language, and cultural barriers, and navigation of an unfamiliar healthcare system for Asian Americans. Resources include a library of downloadable brochures, videos, blogs, and a calendar of events.

Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum

apiahf.org 415-954-9988 Educational tools and materials to help people understand healthcare reform and its impact on Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

The National Center for Reducing Asian American Cancer Health Disparities

aancart.org 916-734-5371 Health educational materials to learn about healthy living, cancer screening, cancer treatments, and more. Health educators and clinicians can also download these materials and share them with their students and patients.

Various Ethnic Groups

US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health

minorityhealth.hhs.gov 240-453-2882 A one-stop source for minority health literature, research, and referrals for consumers, community organizations, and health professionals. Information on health issues specific to African Americans, Native Americans and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Hispanics, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders is available through the Resource Center, from access to online documents to database searches to customized responses to requests for information and assistance.